Maple Allee

Allen CR (2004):

Maple Allee

The two Conservation Restriction areas spanning Concord Avenue are comprised of approximately 4.9 acres of land, and are predominately undeveloped open space. The Conservation Restriction preserves valuable open space in a densely developed urban environment where open space is rapidly diminishing. The Conservation Restriction areas serve as a source of significant scenic and open space as well as historic value to the residents of the Town of Belmont.

The restricted area on the north side of Concord Avenue consists of a gravel lane lined with mature trees, vacant fields and meadows. It extends over 750 feet to Somerset Street, a designated scenic way. The portion of the Conservation Restriction Area along Concord Avenue contributes to the scenic, natural condition of the general area as it appears to vehicles and pedestrians traveling on Concord Avenue by providing a “long view” or vista of undeveloped land almost all the way to Somerset Street. The uniform mature maple trees lining both sides of the lane are at least 100 years old. At the northern end of the Conservation Restriction, the land widens significantly into an area of fields and meadows, including additional trees and bushes, left largely in their natural state and ends in a building envelope enclosing a farmhouse once belonging to relatives of the well-known landscape painter, Winslow Homer, who is believed to have walked this property, and who may have used it as inspiration in some of his works of art.

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The restricted area on the south side of Concord Avenue, consisting of forest, fields and meadows, abuts an existing conservation restriction, and  enlarges and fortifies that existing restriction. It  is highly visible from Concord Avenue and includes a stone wall which is a continuation of a wall protected by another  restriction and contributes to the scenic natural beauty of that part of Concord Avenue. Within the  restricted area is an historic boundary marker, pre-dating the incorporation of the Town of Belmont, delineating the original intersection of the towns of Cambridge, Waltham and Watertown. It also contains a greenhouse that has been used for many years by the Belmont Garden Club.

These two Conservation Restriction areas have an important relationship to neighboring open space, as they contribute to the ability of the area to sustain wildlife. The Conservation Restriction areas are within six hundred feet of the Weeks Pond area of the Audubon Society Habitat Wildlife Sanctuary, a wildlife reservation consisting of nearly 87 acres of protected open space. They are also close to the large open space area formerly owned by McLean Hospital that is now owned by the Town of Belmont and has been dedicated to conservation and public access.

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